Current Seminar Series

The nanomedicine center is pleased to cross-post nano-related seminars for 2018, in cooperation with departments on campus


Hans Robinson, Virginia Tech

Campus Locations Thatcher Building for Biological and Biophysical Chemistry (TBBC)
Room Name/Number 4630 TBBC
Contact Name Jennifer Shumaker-Parry
Contact Phone 5-1434
Contact Email shumaker-parry@chem.utah.edu
Campus Wide Event Yes

A/P/M Seminar
Professor Hans Robinson, Virginia Tech

Site: www1.phys.vt.edu…

"Light-mediated nanoassembly"

To fully realize the promises of nanoscience and technology, it will be necessary to learn how to assemble different nanoparticles into more complex structures, akin to the way atoms assemble into molecules. At the length scales involved, conventional lithographic methods work poorly or not at all, and the fabrication will need to take place using strategies such as directed self-assembly. In this talk, I will outline our recent work on using light-triggered chemical reactions to induce the formation of patches in metal nanoparticles, thereby directing them to assemble into aligned structures. Plasmonic resonances and the lightning-rod effect make it possible to modify the surface chemistry within patches at specific locations on the surfaces of particles. The location and alignment of the patches can be controlled with the light’s polarization and wavelength, as well as by the specific shape of the assembling particles. I will present results involving both single-photon activation, where the reactions are induced with ultraviolet light, and two-photon activation, where we can use red and infrared light for the same purpose, allowing us to be resonant with the plasmon resonances of particles with non-spherical shapes.

Host: Jennifer Shumaker-Parry


Thursday, September 27, 2018, 4 - 5pm 

 

J. Calvin Giddings Lecture with Robert M. Corn, UC-Irvine

Campus Locations Thatcher Building for Biological and Biophysical Chemistry (TBBC)
Room Name/Number 4630 TBBC
Contact Name Joel Harris
Contact Phone 581-3585
Contact Email harrisj@chem.utah.edu
Campus Wide Event Yes

J. Calvin Giddings Lecture
Analytical Colloquium

Professor Robert M. Corn
Departments of Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering
University of California-Irvine, Irvine, 

Site: www.chem.uci.edu…
group website: rmcorninfo.weebly.com

"Nanostructured Mesoscale Optical Materials"

The properties of any surface - metal, semiconductor, glass, plastic or even liquid - can be altered drastically when textured or decorated with tiny sub-microscopic structures. These “nanostructures” can be rings, discs, cubes or more complicated shapes -- where each one is about 200 times smaller than the width of a human hair. "Nanostructured mesoscale surfaces" that have patterned features both on the nanoscale and mesoscale (0.2 to 5 microns) can be designed to exhibit unique optical, wetting and chemical properties. They exist in nature on the surfaces of lotus leaves, moth eyes and the wings of butterflies. In this talk we will tour this 2D nanoworld. In his labs at UC Irvine, Dr. Corn and his team design and fabricate a variety of nanowire, nanoring and nanocone surfaces that can be used make broadband anti-reflective coatings, diffracting films that split up the laser beams, and “biochip” grating sensors that can quickly screen for proteins and DNA.

Host: Joel Harris


Friday, September 28, 2018, 1 - 2pm 
 
J. Calvin Giddings Lecture with Rob Corn, UC-Irvine
Campus Locations Thatcher Building for Biological and Biophysical Chemistry (TBBC)
Room Name/Number 4630 TBBC
Contact Name Joel Harris
Contact Phone 581-3585
Contact Email harrisj@chem.utah.edu
Campus Wide Event Yes

J. Calvin Giddings Lecture
Robert M. Corn
Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering
University of California, Irvine

Site: www.chem.uci.edu…
group website: rmcorninfo.weebly.com

"Single Nanoparticle Biosensing"

Near-infrared single nanoparticle surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) microscopy is a relatively new spectroscopic method for measuring the integrated refractive index of individual metal, oxide and polymer nanoparticles. In a single nanoparticle SPRI experiment the specific adsorption of nanoparticles onto a chemically modified gold thin film creates point diffraction patterns in the sequential real-time SPRI differential reflectivity images. Counting the point diffraction patterns in these real-time SPRI measurements can be used as a digital biosensing methodology for the detection of single DNA, RNA or protein molecules attached either to the nanoparticle or to the surface.[1]  Additionally, the intensity of each diffraction pattern in an image can be quantitated to create a single nanoparticle reflectivity change value, ∆%Rnp. Single nanoparticle refractive index measurements are used to monitor to measure particle size distributions, aggregation and bioaffinity uptake of various polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes and gas-filled protein vesicles.[2]

1. A. R. Halpern, J. B. Wood, Y. Wang and R. M. Corn, "Single Nanoparticle Near-Infrared Surface Plasmon Resonance Microscopy for Real-Time Measurements of DNA Hybridization Adsorption" ACS Nano, 8 1022-1030 (2014).

2. A. M. Maley, G. J. Lu, M. G. Shapiro and R. M. Corn, "Characterizing Single Polymeric and Protein Nanoparticles with Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Measurements" ACS Nano, 11 7447-7456 (2017).

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Robert M. Corn is a Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering at the University of California, Irvine. Prof. Corn received a B. A. in Chemistry from the University of California, San Diego, and a Ph. D. from the University of California, Berkeley. From 1985 to 2004, he was a Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 2004, he moved to the Department of Chemistry at the UC Irvine where his current research centers on the creation of new interfacial chemistries and biochemistries. With over 160 publications and 14 patents, Prof. Corn has dedicated his career to the development and application of surface-sensitive spectroscopies such as surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI), optical second harmonic generation (SHG), and polarization-modulation Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the characterization of solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces. His current research interests include the study of bioaffinity uptake into single polymer nanoparticles, the fabrication of nanostructured interfaces with unique optical, physical and properties, the on-chip templated biosynthesis of nucleic acid and protein microarrays, the synthesis of magnetic nanomaterials for biosensing and high frequency inductor applications, and the study of DNA structure via nanoparticle incorporation.

Host: Joel Harris

 


 

 

Last Updated: 9/19/18